The framing

September 26, 2016

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Now the shipping container has landed it needs to be framed up on the inside so we can line it, put in the doors and windows, and make it weather tight.

The first question I needed to answer was how to attach the framing to the walls?

With a shipping container you don’t want to make any holes in the container itself (that’s weakens the structure and allows moisture in) so I needed a solution that would attach the framing without puncturing the metal. Even though there is quite a lot on YouTube about building with shipping containers, there isn’t much about this particular step.  It seems a lot of people just pin the frame to the floor, but I want to be able to hang things on the walls so I need a plan that is a bit more robust.

After some research, my sister in law (who is a rep at Holdfast) put me onto a product called Carbond. Carbond is a glue and sealant used in the automotive industry and is the same stuff that holds your windscreen in place.

I called the Holdfast technical advisor and he said the glue would be perfect for attaching the wooden framing to the container walls. I just needed to make sure the walls were free of dirt and grease and I would be good to go.

He also said the ANZ banks were using this method for their portable banking containers, so I felt reassured it had been tested.

So over the next few weeks I framed the inside. I decided not to put in dwangs (the horizontal bits you see in framing) because I am going to line the container with 12mm plywood and it is rigid enough not to require the dwangs. I can’t claim to have done this all on my own, my lovely partner Gabor put the ceiling framing up for me and screwed it onto to the wall framing

The Carbond was brilliant, but also really smelly - it’s a good thing my container has very good air flow i.e. big holes where the doors and windows will be going! 

Now there were some issues that I won’t bore you with but all in all it went quite smoothly and now that means the windows and doors can go in. Exciting!

                    



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